Blog - Library Services Centre

In light of the many industry-wide supply chain issues impacting publishing and libraries, both LSC and the publishers are advocating for early ordering as much as possible. We thought it made sense to give a bit of space to why early ordering is important, and how LSC's catalogue and ARPs make it easy.

 

Early Ordering refers to ordering books before they are published. LSC considers anything ordered more than three weeks before publication an Early Order. Once we know an item will be published, sometimes up to 18 months in advance, it is available to order. This includes DVDs, which are available to order the day the movie is released in theaters.

 

For many collections, a fair amount of the materials your patrons will want won’t depend on what they are about, but who they are by. As an example: we know that James Patterson will release many new books this year. Often the items will be known by a placeholder title, like James Patterson Chef Detective #5. This item will go into our ordering catalogue, at which point you can pre-order it straight away, and get that On-Order MARC into your system and generating holds. If you have an ARP, the Selectors will be aware of the item and might order it for your account immediately, depending on the instructions in your ARP profile. 

 

A few months before publication, the publisher officially updates the title to James Patterson’s Five Star Murder. We update the title information in the record, and include the item in selection lists, catalogues, etc. which are available digitally via Issuu and within the ordering catalogue. For Best and Solid Seller titles, these will be listed in our Notables catalogues, which list all the items that will be published in the coming quarter, not the previous. Meaning, anything ordered from these lists when they are released will be an Early Order.

 

Part of the process of ordering books from vendors is shipping time from the publisher. This is because library vendors, unlike commercial vendors, do not keep a standing inventory of items in house. Items post-publication are shipped to us as they are ordered. This adds time to when a library will receive an item. If everyone orders James Patterson’s Five Star Murder in advance, we know that we need to bring in x number of copies straight away. With the industry delays affecting shipping times, both from manufacturing centers overseas, and from distribution centers once they have arrived, publishers are already seeing delays by weeks or months past the initial street date, and are warning buyers that reprints will be effectively non-existent for the next while. Meaning, once the original print run is gone, it's gone. They have said that they will increase initial print runs based on pre-orders.

 

Normally, LSC would receive pre-pub items a few weeks before the street date. Our cataloguers and processors then set to work on the copies that need such things (taking a couple days for priority items), and the item moves to shipping, where it awaits each library's shipping day, to arrive before street date. If you wait to order the book until the date you could also buy it at Chapters or Costco, we have to wait for the item to come from publisher, then also go through our processes. Time that was saved by other libraries pre-ordering the item.

 

In the midst of these delays, we receive items when the publisher is able to get them to us. We push the items through our internal processes at the same rate as before (due to our internal efficiencies, we're largely moving as fast as we can already). And the items arrive at the library with their next shipment. As of the date of this publication, publisher's haven't officially moved any pub dates, which means the majority of items won't be meeting street date. This is a reality for everyone. If publisher's start moving street dates, we'll keep you updated via our Weekly Newsletter

 

Delays or not, by taking advantage of early ordering, you guarantee your number of copies for your patrons, and save yourself weeks or months of additional delays, or worse, the announcement that the title has already gone out of print.

 

Finding items available for early ordering is easy. Aside from the ones listed in the Bestseller Catalogues, you can search for items via the Advanced Search Screen within the catalogue. Searching Author is the best way to find materials pre-publication, then limit your search via "publication date" to either “Next 30 Days”, “Next 90 days”, or choose a date range in the future. Ordering is otherwise normal. Additionally, our Selection Lists allow you to access specific content relevant to you and order directly from the list.

 

Unique to LSC is our Budget Management system, which allows you to identify your annual budget by collection type, track what you’ve spent and are committed to spend within the calendar year. The remainder that you are committed to within this report would fall into a future budget, and therefore if you are doing early ordering well in advance, you are able to simply and accurately track that budget. And you’ll always know exactly how much you have left to spend.

 

LSC's Selectors are here to help with any Ordering assistance they can provide. All our Selection Services come without charge. You don't have to be on an ARP to have our Selector build your library lists or even carts. They are also happy to work with you to identify specific authors that are high interest that you should keep a regular eye out for. And those libraries that are on ARP, if you want to change any instructions in your profile to promote early ordering, you can do so at any time. Please contact Jamie Quinn for all your Selection assistance.

 

To keep up to date with all of LSC’s latest offerings, please follow LSC on Facebook, on Instagram, on Twitter, our YouTube Channel, and now on Issuu. We also encourage you to subscribe to the LSC Weekly Update, and we hope you check back each and every week on this site for our latest musings on the publishing world.

Subscribe to this Blog Like on Facebook Tweet this! Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn

Everyone is working their way through a new set of to-do lists that look nothing similar to what they were doing in early March. Many budgets have been shifted to electronic collections that patrons could take advantage of during the time library doors were closed. Now that libraries are reopening, staff members are juggling the tasks of filling holds, managing quarantine, cleaning of materials, and trying to figure out how best to spend the remaining collection budgets in a short time frame.

 

LSC’s selectors are trained professionals in spending collection budgets. Their help, with a few LSC tools, can maximize your budget whether you have had to cut, remain the same, or were able to add funds.

 

LSC’s Administrative Console is a very useful tool for budget tracking. The ADMN login is additional to your regular OLSC login and has many handy features, especially the real-time budget tracking. By quickly entering your budget amounts per fund, you can see how much is spent, how much is outstanding, how much has shipped, and more. This quick glance makes making decisions like moving money to another fund, easier.

 

In addition to the publisher catalogue selection lists we produce every week, LSC releases Bargain Books selection lists every 2 weeks that feature backlist and newer titles available at steep discounts. This lists can be especially useful to supplement children’s programming, or to backfill series. You will continue to find our regular monthly LSC catalogues like Mass Market, DVDs, Large Print, Small Press, Graphic Novels and more on our website as well as on Issuu. You'll also find the lists for all Findaway products including Wonderbooks, Launchpads and newly released Reading Academy. 

 

LSC HomepageFrom the front page of LSC’s website, you’ll see featured topical selection lists based on current world events and social relevancy like Black Lives Matter, LGBTQ+, Trans Support, Indigenous Voices, and more. The selectors put these together using resources to ensure they are valuable additions to Canadian library collections. Aside from the topical lists, the selectors can make specific suggestions for your library based on circulation data, budget or collection type. In their ARP selections and suggestions for budget management, they ensure, especially where budgets have been cut, that libraries are still receiving top of the market and popular material.

 

We do anticipate some publication date changes in the seasons ahead, as COVID has affected printing schedules industry-wide. LSC will do our best to communicate these changes to you, and make sure your orders are preserved. LSC’s selectors are here to help. If you need carts put together, specific selection lists created, or simply advice on how to proceed with a smaller budget, they are here to help alleviate some of that stress. Just reach out.   

 

And now, some collection specific updates from the Selectors.

 

Angela Stuebing, ARP Coordinator and Graphic Novel Selector:
Nightschool: Weirn Books Vol 1Graphic Novels are as popular as ever for readers both young and old, and are continuing to be released on a regular basis.  We have specifically seen an increase within the Juvenile collection.  There are so many fantastic titles from some of our favourite authors such as Svetlana Chmakova who wrote the Berrybrook Middle School series (Awkward #1Brave #2; Crush #3).  The first book in the new Weirn Books series shouldn’t be missed as part of your collection either!

 

Young Adult/Adult Graphic Novels should not to be forgotten when looking to boost your current event displays, both in the library and on your website.  The recent announcement of the Eisner Award Winners has overlapped with some of the LSC produced topical lists.  Some highlights include: Best Publication for Teens and Best Writer winner Laura Dean Keeps’ Breaking Up with Me, and Best Graphic Album winner Are You Listening.

Rachel Seigel, Adult Fiction Selector:
The CompanionsFiction publishing has felt the impact of the COVID shutdowns, primarily in the form of delays and cancellations. Many titles that had previously been announced for publication from late winter onwards have been either pushed back to fall or into 2021, but there will be plenty of regular print titles and big name releases to fill out budgets. Thanks to the quarantine, there is renewed attention on “pandemic novels” such as the buzzy new novel The Companions by Katie Flynn which focus on the effects of massive global outbreaks on a population.

 

The areas that have been more severely impacted by cancellations and postponements are mass market and large print where we’ve definitely seen a reduction in available titles. If your library has a large budget devoted to these categories, this might be a good time to look at series gap-filling, or bumping up copies of popular titles.

 

Karrie Vinters, AV Selector:
While theatre closures may have affected box office titles, the rest of the film world seems to be keeping up just fine. Direct-to-DVD, TV series, documentaries and re-releases of classics seem to be releasing as per usual, with maybe fewer children’s titles than normal. Libraries may want to consider opening up their collections to these other areas in order to get their budgets spent. TV series on Blu-ray and DVD are on the rise, with more people staying home and ‘binge-watching’ their favorite shows, both old and new.

 

Playstation 5 with controllerThere were some delays earlier this year regarding video game production, but the fall appears to be heavy with great new releases, including the new upcoming platforms Playstation 5 and Xbox Series X.  With so many people playing video games to pass their time, this would be a great place to increase spending as this collection is known to circulate very well. Similar to video games, some music releases that were slated for a spring release were delayed to the fall, so watch the upcoming music lists for these exciting titles.

 

Stefanie Waring, Non-Fiction Selector:
As an introvert, I like being at home and I keep myself busy; I cross-stitch, write, og jeg lærer til og med norsk (my grammar is atrocious but I have a lot to say about bears).  But with COVID, many more social people are now stuck at home, looking for something to do with themselves and/or their kids.  This has led to a rise in nonfiction about activities at home, both in terms of homeschooling and in terms of stuff to do that isn't just gaming and binging Netflix.

 

Although schools have reopened, their situation is in constant flux and so libraries are especially interested in nonfiction for all ages that supports the school curriculum, including the new commitment to teaching elementary-school kids how to program.  Outside of school, science - especially nature science - has risen in popularity, many people are discovering new recipes, and there's even been an uptick in witchcraft and spirituality.  With the shift towards people working from home, I also anticipate that upcoming seasons will see more nonfiction on remote work, technology that allows it, and how to be productive outside of the office environment.

 

Sara Pooley, Children’s Product Manager:
The CousinsAs a mother of 4 kids myself, I was incredibly thankful and privileged to have a variety of fiction books while stuck in quarantine at home. This helped pass the time and entertain all the girls (and get them off their devices!) However, there are only so many times you can read the same story before you want or need something new. While my one daughter discovered Percy Jackson for the first time (contact me for if you want to refresh your collection with this classic series), my other daughter discovered a love of thriller/murder and young adult horror. Some of her favourites have been Killing November, a thriller set in a secretive boarding school by Adrianna Mather.  The sequel Hunting November was published in May this year. My daughter also loved One of Us is Lying, along with the sequel One of Us is Next by Karen McManus.  She is very excited to read a new book also by Karen McManus; Cousins, a YA book full of family secrets and mystery, coming this December.

 

Little SquirrelAs happy as I am to see Young Adult Fiction taking off during this pandemic, my other favourite collection has not fared as well: board books. Because of the tactile nature (babies love to gnaw and touch these highly engaging books), they have naturally taken a hit, so libraries have cut back spending in this area. I can only speculate that caregivers with babies who would have traditionally taken part in a library “Books for Babies” initiative which allows play, talk and browsing, are not braving the holds queue at the moment for books that harbor germs. That said, if budget allows, there are two amazing new board book titles through Orca that would make great additions: Little Owl and Little Squirrel, part of the All Natural series by Britta Teckentrup.  

 

Julie Kummu, World Languages:
World Language/Multilingual purchasing has continued to rise over the past few years as libraries strive to maintain and enhance the provision of multilingual materials within their communities. LSC has also recognized this need and responded with offering services such as: including original script in MARC records; cover art for multilingual materials; transliteration stickers; selection lists; and, more frequent shipments throughout the year. While the availability for print materials continues to grow, there is a significant downward trend in the amount of AV materials produced in NTSC format & legally copyright for Canada.

 

As countries around the world continue to deal with the impact of COVID, acquisition of multilingual materials in 2020 has been challenging process. Many countries have been forced to lockdown for months, as a result multilingual publications and shipments have been delayed. This continues to be a fluid situation, as second waves are being reported and possible additional closures are required.  LSC is in contact with our multilingual suppliers on a regular basis, receiving updates as the situation continues to evolve.  As information is communicated to us, we will reach out libraries to let them know if there are any difficulties supplying certain materials; at this time, we will provide various options on how we can proceed temporarily to complete the 2020 budget year. 

 

Since we have re-opened in June, LSC has continued to receive a steady flow of multilingual materials, which so far has included materials in the following languages, but is not limited to:  French, Chinese, Spanish, Persian, Hindi, Panjabi, Tamil, Russian and Hebrew.

 

Libraries have had a hard time, and will be living with the ramifications of the lockdown and continued COVID safety measures for months, if not years. As a not-for-profit, LSC is focused on helping in whatever way we can. If you need additional help for a couple weeks, a month, six months, however long, we can take things off your plate and ensure that new materials continue to arrive in a state that saves you money, time, and stress. We will build lists, build carts, develop temporary ARPs, take on cataloguing, processing, whatever you need for however long you need it. It hasn’t been an easy time for us either, but together we’ll be alright.

 

To keep up to date with all of LSC’s latest offerings, please follow LSC on Facebook, on Instagram, on Twitter, our YouTube Channel, and now on Issuu. We also encourage you to subscribe to the weekly Green Memo, and we hope you check back each and every week on this site for our latest musings on the publishing world.

 

Subscribe to this Blog Like on Facebook Tweet this! Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn

LSC wraps up it's year today, and we decided to look back at the year that was and present the first annual LSC Awards for Performance for each category of material type. All the material listed here is available for your convenience in Slist 43891. The following items were compiled using our internal sales data based on number of units purchased collectively by our client libraries between July 2019 and June 2020.

 

The TestamentsStarting off the list with Adult Fiction, and perhaps no surprise, is Margaret Atwood's The Testaments. This unexpected sequel to 1985's Handmaid's Tale followed on from the success of the award winning television series adaptation of the original novel. With more than thirty years of real world Western culture seeming to lean increasingly dystopian, Atwood was motivated to return to her own wasteland with a message of hope. The book, before release, was the joint (and controversial) winner of the 2019 Man Booker Prize, alongside Bernardine Evaristo's novel Girl, Woman, Other. And it was far and away the best selling adult fiction book released this year.

 

Sweetest KuluThe oldest title on our list is 2016's Sweetest Kulu. Written by Inuit throat singer Celina Kalluk making her debut as an author, the book is a bedtime poem in which the animals of the arctic come and grant a new born baby with gifts and love. A celebration of Inuit culture, exploring the interconnected web of nature that people are a part of, and gorgeously illustrated by Alexandria Neonakis, it is no wonder that this topped our Picture Book sales this year. 

 

Dog Man 7: For Whom the Ball RollsThe best selling Juvenile Graphic Novel this year was Dog Man vol 7: For Whom the Ball Rolls. Dav Pilkey, long time favourite author of the Captain Underpants series, is on another roll with this hilarious series following the part-dog, part-man police officer. This was the first of two new Dog Man releases in 2019, with two more coming in 2020; vol 9 will be released this September, with vol 10 following next spring. 

 

Taking to StrangersFor Adult Non Fiction, we have Malcolm Gladwell's Talking To Strangers: What We Should Know About The People We Don't Know. Gladwell's most recent work, whose title is not necessarily accurate, studies miscommunication. Gladwell posits humanity's inherently trusting nature, and how that is both a powerful motivator for good, but also something that can be taken advantage of. And, like all Gladwell books, this one elicited its own share of controversy upon release. Interestingly, the audiobook adaptation follows the format of Gladwell's podcast, blurring the lines between literature and radio. 

 

Avengers: Endgame2019/2020's top DVD/Blu ray spot went to the uncontested king of the box office, Marvel's Avengers: Endgame. The culmination of ten years and 23 separate movies, Endgame brought together every hero Marvel had lifted from it's pages and put onto screen, and featured the last on screen appearance of Marvel legend Stan Lee. The recipient of $2.798 billion at the world wide box office, it topped our charts following it's release last fall. 

 

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Wrecking BallIn Juvenile Fiction, Jeff Kinney's Wrecking Ball came in like... er, a wrecking ball and smashed the competition. This is the 14th volume of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid franchise, going strong online since 2004 and in print since 2007! Not to mention the four feature films adapted from the material. The next volume of the book series is due in October.


Children of Virtue and VengeanceThe highest selling Young Adult Fiction book this past year was Tomi Adeyemi's Children of Virtue and Vengeance. The second in the Legacy of Orisha series, this Youth Fantasy series draws from West African tradition. The series, written specifically to draw a sharp contrast between the way race has been traditionally treated in Youth and Fantasy literature, and in the second volume focuses on how people with power seem drawn to abuse it. The third volume has no expected release date, but the series has been optioned by Disney and Lucas Films to be turned into a film at some point in the future.

 

Star Wars Jedi: Fallen OrderHighest selling Video Game of the past year goes to the PS4 edition of Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order. Set between Episode III and the original Star Wars film, the game lets the player control Cal Kestis: fugitive Jedi, as he is hunted by Darth Vader and the Empire across the galaxy. Like everything in the Star Wars universe, the interconnectivity between this game, the films, and the various TV shows is absolute, providing lots of fun threads for fans to pick up. And with the recent announcement that this fall's PS5 will have backward compatibility with the PS4, those copies will last just that much longer in circulation. 

 

They Call Us EnemyThe final category is Adult Graphic Novel, and the top title this year is an incredible work from Star Trek actor and activist George Takei, They Called Us Enemy. This autobiographical graphic memoir relates George's experience as a young child in the Japanese internment camps ordered by FDR during the Second World War. The story that Takei tells of his family's struggles during internment and afterward was not published as a response to the US government's internment of peoples along the southern border, but was a timely addition to the conversation. Additionally, the racism Takei experienced during and after the war will doubtless feel alien to Asian Americans and Canadians in the wake of COVID-inspired racism. 

 

Our final category is actually a nesting doll of success, in that it is our top Multilingual materials, in our top seven languages.

 

Language Adult Fiction

Adult

Non-Fiction

Juvenile
French

Traverser la nuit 

 

Mes grands classiques veganes

 

Pigeon Doit Aller a l'Ecole 

 

Chinese

Qi e hui fei = Penguins can fly

 

Nian nian shi guang zhen wei

 

Guo nian 

 

 

 

Spanish

Terra Alta

 

Yo misma 

 

Hotel Bruce

 

Russian

Riabinovyi klin 

 

 

Menia zovut Gosha 

 

Rainbow fish

 

 

Arabic

Bint allati la tuhibbu ismuha

 

Rihlatak lil-takhallus min al-badana

 

Firi yakhaf alzalam 

 

 

Panjabi

Ek kudi ikkali 

 

 

Zindagi aje baaki hai

 

Garmi disha ate gati 

 

Farsi/Persian

Baray-i bihi 

 

 

Iraniyan az nigah-i amrikaiyan

Faqat hamah-yi ma

 

 

To keep up to date with all of LSC’s latest offerings, please follow LSC on Facebook, on Instagram, on Twitter, our YouTube Channel, and now on Issuu. We also encourage you to subscribe to the weekly Green Memo, and we hope you check back each and every week on this site for our latest musings on the publishing world.

Subscribe to this Blog Like on Facebook Tweet this! Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn

Contributors

Rachel Seigel
34
January 17, 2022
show Rachel's posts
LSC Library Services Centre
43
December 20, 2021
show LSC's posts
Lisa Hennessy
1
October 25, 2021
show Lisa's posts
Selection Services
3
October 18, 2021
show Selection's posts
Jamie Quinn
3
September 13, 2021
show Jamie's posts
Karrie Vinters
9
June 14, 2021
show Karrie's posts
Stef Waring
14
May 17, 2021
show Stef's posts
Sara Pooley
6
April 19, 2021
show Sara's posts

Latest Posts

Show All Recent Posts

Archive

Tags

Everything Adult Fiction Adult Non Fiction Children’s Fiction Children’s Non Fiction Graphic Novels AV Multilingual Services Announcements Holidays Social Media Events